Indian rocket that US once ‘grounded’ will put Isro-Nasa satellite in space

Indian rocket that US once ‘grounded’ will put Isro-Nasa satellite in space

New Delhi: In 1992, the United States under President George Bush had struck sanctions against the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) and prevented Russia from sharing cryogenic engine technology with India’s space agency to verify India for missiles .
Two decades later, the US space agency NASA has teamed up with ISRO to jointly develop satellite imagery of the world’s most expensive earth that will cost the two countries over $ 1.5 billion. The irony is GSLV, which is likely to place its NASA-ISRO + Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) satellite in orbit in 2021, the same rocket for the cryogenic engine the United States imposes on India.
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Leaving behind the past, ISRO and NASA occupy the Nisar 2 200 kg satellite building, which will provide a detailed view of the earth using advanced radar imagery. It is designed to observe and take action on some of the planet’s complex processes, including alterations in ecosystems, ice collapse and natural hazards.
NASA is interested in when ISRO India Space Agency in April 2012 launched the first satellite imagery of the country’s + indigenous radar (RISAT-1), which some have called a spy satellite, which allowed to obtain images of the surface of The Earth during day and night in all weather conditions.
Negotiations continued for two years, but the formal agreement for Nisar satellite came as Prime Minister Narendra Modi signed a statement with former US President Barack Obama during his visit to the United States. in 2014 . The purpose of the collaboration was to use the satellite for “Benefits of Mankind”, as satellite map data will be available to all.
Currently, the Space Applications Center (SAC), based in Ahmedabad, tests flight “mini version” of the radar satellite in the sky of the city. The “mini radar” developed by SAC was repaired on a Beechcraft Super King B 200 – ISRO property – for in-flight testing primarily to “understand climate and geographic conditions.”
The director of SAC, Tapan Misra, said: “We are testing the radar taking images of about 8 km above sea level the same area will be studied by ground level scientists to understand the level.

He added: “For the analysis of ground-level data, NGOs, academic institutions, government departments and people with scientific knowledge are organized. This process of air data analysis will continue in Gujarat for three months until the end of The same exercise of air and land for three years in 39 localities across the country, including Himalayan glaciers, Ganga, Sundarbans Rann de Kutch, Andhra, Kerala and Karnataka to study geological changes in forests, vegetation , Rivers and glaciers. “

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